Jun 6, 2019 - Uncategorized    No Comments

My day on the beaches of Normandy, 75 years later

Two weeks ago it was my privilege to visit the Normandy region during my husband’s and my trip visit to France. We visited the Caen Memorial Museum, walked on the Utah and Omaha beaches, and in the village of Arromanches saw the Mulberry Harbors – massive manmade ports stretched across the water that made the invasion possible and served the allied forces for 10 more months (one of the many things I learned about on this tour). The beaches were so calm and peaceful, imagining what transpired there 75 years ago is overwhelming. The 9,000-plus white marble tombstones at the American Cemetery was sobering, to say the least.

This being the 75 anniversary of D-Day was one of the draws for this trip, our eighth with the local Edventures tour group, which featured four nights in Normandy and four in Paris. Today, I want to share my pictures related to D-Day.

Here’s one paragraph from the Army’s website: On June 6, 1944, more than 160,000 Allied troops landed along a 50-mile stretch of heavily-fortified French coastline, to fight Nazi Germany on the beaches of Normandy, France. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower called the operation a crusade in which, “we will accept nothing less than full victory.” More than 5,000 Ships and 13,000 aircraft supported the D-Day invasion, and by day’s end, the Allies gained a foot-hold in Continental Europe. The cost in lives on D-Day was high. More than 9,000 Allied Soldiers were killed or wounded, but their sacrifice allowed more than 100,000 Soldiers to begin the slow, hard slog across Europe, to defeat Adolf Hitler’s crack troops.

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