Aug 11, 2017 - Uncategorized    1 Comment

The newspaper is what’s important, not the building — but I’ll miss it

The newspaper — moving today a mere half-mile away — has been a landmark on its Lake Avenue corner for decades.

I fell in love with The Saratogian 40 years ago, when I began my newspaper career. It was my privilege to run the newsroom for many years. The little brick building a block from Broadway and kitty-corner from City Hall represented to me the epitome of essential small-town journalism.

My first beat was city reporter. I’d run back and forth from the police station or mayor’s office to file stories and consult with editors. I’d walk downtown for comments, story ideas, and a hot dog.

Over the years, I mourned when the press was sold in favor of remote printing, but I welcomed the internet and its ability to report, share, save and update news.

When The Saratogian’s owners, Digital First Media, sold the entire block, including the building, in 2012, the newspaper became tenants. Well before I left the newspaper two years ago, it was apparent that the ability to work from anywhere, coupled with the shrinking number of employees, made the beloved old building like an old pair of Jennifer Hudson’s pants: way too big.

So, today’s the day: The Saratogian is moving from 20 Lake Ave. to 7 Wells St., a little over half a mile away. Out of downtown’s line of sight, but not far. And, I’ll bet, in the new offices staffers won’t have to wear gloves in the winter and sweaters in summer.

I’ll admit I’m a little sad to see the end of an era, to acknowledge that the staff is too small for the building, and to lose my longtime perk of a downtown parking space.

Shake it off, Barbara.

I’ve said for decades that a city the size of Saratoga Springs is fortunate to have a daily newspaper. The current cadre of employees work hard to bring us the local news. It’s the building that’s closing, not the newspaper. Lucky for all of us.

1 Comment

  • Such a sad end of an era on Lake Ave. It’s not just the move that is sad, but rather the reasons for it. 40 years ago when Barbara was a reporter and I was Publisher of The Saratogian we had close to 100 employees and a circulation more than 3 times greater than it is now. It’s sad that objective printed news is something future generations may never know or appreciate.

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